Write For Results Online

Module 1:

We-ing all over your Reader

 


VIDEO LESSON 

 

EXERCISE:

Are you writer-centric or reader-centric?  

 


Pick a recent document where you were trying to influence someone or persuade them to do something.

(This exercise doesn’t work for merely informative documents that tell the reader what you plan to do or have done — in which case you will inevitably use the words I, we, us or our a lot.)

Count the number of times you used the words I, we, us and/or the name of your organisation, team or department.

Write down the number.

Count the number of times you used the words you, your, and/or the name of the reader's organization, team or department.

Write down the number.

Now compare the two numbers. What’s the ratio?

If the total in #2 is bigger than the total in #3, your document is writer-centric. If it’s the other way round, it’s reader- centric ― which is the way to be!

EXERCISE:

Are you writer-centric

or reader-centric?  

 


Pick a recent document where you were trying to influence someone or persuade them to do something.

(This exercise doesn’t work for merely informative documents that tell the reader what you plan to do or have done — in which case you will inevitably use the words I, we, us or our a lot.)

Count the number of times you used the words I, we, us and/or the name of your organisation, team or department.

Write down the number.

Count the number of times you used the words I, we, us and/or the name of your organisation, team or department.

Write down the number.

Now compare the two numbers. What’s the ratio?

If the total in #2 is bigger than the total in #3, your document is writer-centric. If it’s the other way round, it’s reader- centric ― which is the way to be!

EXERCISE:

Are you writer-centric or reader-centric?  

 


Pick a recent document where you were trying to influence someone or persuade them to do something.

(This exercise doesn’t work for merely informative documents that tell the reader what you plan to do or have done — in which case you will inevitably use the words I, we, us or our a lot.)

Count the number of times you used the words I, we, us and/or the name of your organisation, team or department.

Write down the number.

Count the number of times you used the words I, we, us and/or the name of your organisation, team or department.

Write down the number.

Now compare the two numbers. What’s the ratio?

If the total in #2 is bigger than the total in #3, your document is writer-centric. If it’s the other way round, it’s reader- centric ― which is the way to be!

The Nasty Nine

Overview of the other eight


  • Poor or Non-existing Planning

    Planning is the most neglected part of the writing process. People pay lip-service to the idea, but most do it badly, if at all. This module looks at the impact of not planning (also known as ‘premature drafting’), the three main reasons to plan, and how much time to spend doing it.

  • Vague Message or Objective

    Vital to effective planning is the ability to nail your main message and objective (the purpose of your communication). This module looks at how to use logic and emotion to drive clarity and impact into your writing. What that means for your reader is frictionless reading and fast engagement.

  • Poor Structure

    Structure is more important than language. No matter how beautifully you write, if your document is ill-structured, unnavigable and poorly signposted, you’ll lose your reader. This module covers the most common structural mistakes and how to correct them, at a whole document-, paragraph- and sentence-level.

  • Needlessly Formal Language

    The biggest myth of ‘professional’ writing is that it must be formal. But nothing kills personality and reader engagement faster than formal language. This module looks at the science behind this issue, and the single writing technique that corrects it. Your writing will never be the same.

  • Waffle Wordiness and Wind

    Ah, the triplet trolls running amok in most non-fiction! This module is all about conciseness — the Holy Grail of professional drafting — and looks at five ways to achieve it. What that means for you is that every word counts. Your writing will be tight, taut and powerful.

  • Long Sentences

    Long sentences are a death-sentence to good writing. They make your reader work hard to get your message. The solution is ‘FANBOYS’ (For And Nor But Or Yet So). This module shows you how to use these conjunctions to shorten your Average Sentence Length (ASL) and make your reader fall in love with you all over again.

  • Passivitis

    Over-use of the passive voice. Scott calls this ‘the carbon monoxide of your writing’; it’s a killer. This module shows you why, and how to write in the active voice (the clue’s in the name). Don’t worry if it sounds grammatically complicated: The Writing Guy explains everything clearly, with examples.

  • Nounitis

    A common ailment in professional writing, nounitis is the over-use of nouns, especially abstract ones. The cure is alarmingly simple and easy. As a result, your writing will be both briefer and more vigorous.

The Nasty Nine

Overview of the other eight


  • Poor or Non-existing Planning

    Planning is the most neglected part of the writing process. People pay lip-service to the idea, but most do it badly, if at all. This module looks at the impact of not planning (also known as ‘premature drafting’), the three main reasons to plan, and how much time to spend doing it.

  • Vague Message or Objective

    Vital to effective planning is the ability to nail your main message and objective (the purpose of your communication). This module looks at how to use logic and emotion to drive clarity and impact into your writing. What that means for your reader is frictionless reading and fast engagement.

  • Poor Structure

    Structure is more important than language. No matter how beautifully you write, if your document is ill-structured, unnavigable and poorly signposted, you’ll lose your reader. This module covers the most common structural mistakes and how to correct them, at a whole document-, paragraph- and sentence-level.

  • Needlessly Formal Language

    The biggest myth of ‘professional’ writing is that it must be formal. But nothing kills personality and reader engagement faster than formal language. This module looks at the science behind this issue, and the single writing technique that corrects it. Your writing will never be the same.

  • Waffle Wordiness and Wind

    Ah, the triplet trolls running amok in most non-fiction! This module is all about conciseness — the Holy Grail of professional drafting — and looks at five ways to achieve it. What that means for you is that every word counts. Your writing will be tight, taut and powerful.

  • Long Sentences

    Long sentences are a death-sentence to good writing. They make your reader work hard to get your message. The solution is ‘FANBOYS’ (For And Nor But Or Yet So). This module shows you how to use these conjunctions to shorten your Average Sentence Length (ASL) and make your reader fall in love with you all over again.

  • Passivitis

    Over-use of the passive voice. Scott calls this ‘the carbon monoxide of your writing’; it’s a killer. This module shows you why, and how to write in the active voice (the clue’s in the name). Don’t worry if it sounds grammatically complicated: The Writing Guy explains everything clearly, with examples.

  • Nounitis

    A common ailment in professional writing, nounitis is the over-use of nouns, especially abstract ones. The cure is alarmingly simple and easy. As a result, your writing will be both briefer and more vigorous.

The Nasty Nine

Overview of the other eight


  • Poor or Non-existing Planning

    Planning is the most neglected part of the writing process. People pay lip-service to the idea, but most do it badly, if at all. This module looks at the impact of not planning (also known as ‘premature drafting’), the three main reasons to plan, and how much time to spend doing it.

  • Vague Message or Objective

    Vital to effective planning is the ability to nail your main message and objective (the purpose of your communication). This module looks at how to use logic and emotion to drive clarity and impact into your writing. What that means for your reader is frictionless reading and fast engagement.

  • Poor Structure

    Structure is more important than language. No matter how beautifully you write, if your document is ill-structured, unnavigable and poorly signposted, you’ll lose your reader. This module covers the most common structural mistakes and how to correct them, at a whole document-, paragraph- and sentence-level.

  • Needlessly Formal Language

    The biggest myth of ‘professional’ writing is that it must be formal. But nothing kills personality and reader engagement faster than formal language. This module looks at the science behind this issue, and the single writing technique that corrects it. Your writing will never be the same.

  • Waffle Wordiness and Wind

    Ah, the triplet trolls running amok in most non-fiction! This module is all about conciseness — the Holy Grail of professional drafting — and looks at five ways to achieve it. What that means for you is that every word counts. Your writing will be tight, taut and powerful.

  • Long Sentences

    Long sentences are a death-sentence to good writing. They make your reader work hard to get your message. The solution is ‘FANBOYS’ (For And Nor But Or Yet So). This module shows you how to use these conjunctions to shorten your Average Sentence Length (ASL) and make your reader fall in love with you all over again.

  • Passivitis

    Over-use of the passive voice. Scott calls this ‘the carbon monoxide of your writing’; it’s a killer. This module shows you why, and how to write in the active voice (the clue’s in the name). Don’t worry if it sounds grammatically complicated: The Writing Guy explains everything clearly, with examples.

  • Nounitis

    A common ailment in professional writing, nounitis is the over-use of nouns, especially abstract ones. The cure is alarmingly simple and easy. As a result, your writing will be both briefer and more vigorous.

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?


Professionals (eg lawyers, accountants, engineers)

Students

Accidental WritersTM

 

If you're not a professional copywriter or haven't been formally trained to write, but you spend much of your working day writing, then you’re probably an Accidental WriterTM.

 

You may also be a non-native English speaker. You can already write in English, but your written words may not sound like a native, and you may be falling victim to some (or all!) of The Nasty Nine. This programme will help you nail The Nasty Nine and sound like a native English writer.

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?


Professionals (eg lawyers, accountants, engineers)

Students

Accidental WritersTM

 

If you're not a professional copywriter or haven't been formally trained to write, but you spend much of your working day writing, then you’re probably an Accidental WriterTM.

 

You may also be a non-native English speaker. You can already write in English, but your written words may not sound like a native, and you may be falling victim to some (or all!) of The Nasty Nine. This programme will help you nail The Nasty Nine and sound like a native English writer.

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?


Professionals (eg lawyers, accountants, engineers)

Students

Accidental WritersTM

 

 

If you're not a professional copywriter or haven't been formally trained to write, but you spend much of your working day writing, then you’re probably an Accidental WriterTM.

 

You may also be a non-native English speaker. You can already write in English, but your written words may not sound like a native, and you may be falling victim to some (or all!) of The Nasty Nine. This programme will help you nail The Nasty Nine and sound like a native English writer.

SOME OF OUR CLIENTS


SOME OF OUR CLIENTS


SOME OF OUR CLIENTS


ABOUT SCOTT


Scott’s The Writing GuyTM. He’s also the CEO and co-founder of Write for Results.

 

He helps professionals — eg lawyers, accountants, engineers, consultants — engage their clients and prospects through the written word. 

 

He's helped one of the Big Four accountancy firms double its tender win-rate, and recently helped another client explode its win-rate from 14% to 70%, after working with its board for just two days. 

 

In the last 15 years, Scott has travelled the world training over 5000 professionals in persuasive, empathic writing, including staff of The Economist Group and three ‘magic circle’ law firms.

 

A couple of years ago it dawned on Scott that most people were struggling with the same writing issues. Whatever the industry and wherever in the world he worked, there they were again. And again. The Nasty Nine.

 

Nail The Nasty Nine and you‘re on your way to becoming a much better writer. Scott’s wish for you is simple: buy this programme and see your writing — and results — transformed.

 

The guiding principle of his work is that the ability to write well is neither an innate gift nor a Ninja-style black art, but a learnable skill. This programme — and his second book, rhetorica ® — a toolkit of 21 everyday writing techniques — is his contribution to humanising business/corporate communications. When we write Human, we make an authentic connection with our reader or client, and business follows. 

 

As his good friend, Penny Power OBE, says: ‘Business is personal’. 

 

Talking of personal, Scott lives in London and is married, with three grown-up children. 

ABOUT SCOTT


Scott’s The Writing GuyTM. He’s also the CEO and co-founder of Write for Results.

 

He helps professionals — eg lawyers, accountants, engineers, consultants — engage their clients and prospects through the written word. 

 

He's helped one of the Big Four accountancy firms double its tender win-rate, and recently helped another client explode its win-rate from 14% to 70%, after working with its board for just two days. 

 

In the last 15 years, Scott has travelled the world training over 5000 professionals in persuasive, empathic writing, including staff of The Economist Group and three ‘magic circle’ law firms.

 

A couple of years ago it dawned on Scott that most people were struggling with the same writing issues. Whatever the industry and wherever in the world he worked, there they were again. And again. The Nasty Nine.

 

Nail The Nasty Nine and you‘re on your way to becoming a much better writer. Scott’s wish for you is simple: buy this programme and see your writing — and results — transformed.

 

The guiding principle of his work is that the ability to write well is neither an innate gift nor a Ninja-style black art, but a learnable skill. This programme — and his second book, rhetorica ® — a toolkit of 21 everyday writing techniques — is his contribution to humanising business/corporate communications. When we write Human, we make an authentic connection with our reader or client, and business follows. 

 

As his good friend, Penny Power OBE, says: ‘Business is personal’. 

 

Talking of personal, Scott lives in London and is married, with three grown-up children. 

ABOUT SCOTT


Scott’s The Writing GuyTM. He’s also the CEO and co-founder of Write for Results.

 

He helps professionals — eg lawyers, accountants, engineers, consultants — engage their clients and prospects through the written word. 

 

He's helped one of the Big Four accountancy firms double its tender win-rate, and recently helped another client explode its win-rate from 14% to 70%, after working with its board for just two days. 

 

In the last 15 years, Scott has travelled the world training over 5000 professionals in persuasive, empathic writing, including staff of The Economist Group and three ‘magic circle’ law firms.

 

A couple of years ago it dawned on Scott that most people were struggling with the same writing issues. Whatever the industry and wherever in the world he worked, there they were again. And again. The Nasty Nine.

Nail The Nasty Nine and you‘re on your way to becoming a much better writer. Scott’s wish for you is simple: buy this programme and see your writing — and results — transformed.

 

The guiding principle of his work is that the ability to write well is neither an innate gift nor a Ninja-style black art, but a learnable skill. This programme — and his second book, rhetorica ® — a toolkit of 21 everyday writing techniques — is his contribution to humanising business/corporate communications. When we write Human, we make an authentic connection with our reader or client, and business follows. 

 

As his good friend, Penny Power OBE, says: ‘Business is personal’. 

 

Talking of personal, Scott lives in London and is married, with three grown-up children. 

TESTIMONIALS


Clear, concise – everything you would hope for and much, much more.

Penny Dewar

RIAA Barker Gillette LLP

Really good opportunity to reflect on your writing style. Thank you very much Scott!

Jimmy Park

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Brilliant, informative course. Great trainer who knows his stuff! Would highly recommend this. Great day!

Steven Turner

Informa plc

Much more interesting and engaging than I expected

Roxanne Evering

BAE Systems

A huge thank you from the team. 5/5 is an accurate reflection — you are that good.

Kate Bahen, CEO

Charity Intelligence Canada

Best course I've been on since joining PwC! Scott was extremely engaging and covered so much material in a short time. Thanks, Scott.

Robert Clarry

PricewaterhouseCoopers

TESTIMONIALS


Clear, concise – everything you would hope for and much, much more.

 

Penny Dewar

RIAA Barker Gillette LLP

Really good opportunity to reflect on your writing style. Thank you very much Scott!

Jimmy Park

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Brilliant, informative course. Great trainer who knows his stuff! Would highly recommend this. Great day!

Steven Turner

Informa plc

Much more interesting and engaging than I expected.

 

 

Roxanne Evering

BAE Systems

A huge thank you from the team. 5/5 is an accurate reflection — you are that good.

 

Kate Bahen, CEO

Charity Intelligence Canada

Best course I've been on since joining PwC! Scott was extremely engaging and covered so much material in a short time. Thanks, Scott.

Robert Clarry

PricewaterhouseCoopers

TESTIMONIALS


Clear, concise – everything you would hope for and much, much more.

 

 

Penny Dewar

RIAA Barker Gillette LLP

Really good opportunity to reflect on your writing style. Thank you very much Scott!

 

 

Jimmy Park

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Brilliant, informative course. Great trainer who knows his stuff! Would highly recommend this. Great day!

Steven Turner

Informa plc

Much more interesting and engaging than I expected.

 

 

 

 

Roxanne Evering

BAE Systems

A huge thank you from the team. 5/5 is an accurate reflection — you are that good.

 

 

 

Kate Bahen, CEO

Charity Intelligence Canada

Best course I've been on since joining PwC! Scott was extremely engaging and covered so much material in a short time. Thanks, Scott.

Robert Clarry

PricewaterhouseCoopers

© 2019 Write For Results. All Rights Reserved.